The handling capacity of the KSK grain terminal is 6 million tons per year, up to 7 million tons after the reconstruction is completed in 2021; in 2020, the terminal handled more than 5.1 million tons of grain. The share of KSK in Russian grain exports in 2020 was 12%. And I hope that today’s agreement is only the first step towards the switch of enterprises in the Russian logistics industry to low-carbon energy sources,” she added. The “green port” project will enable the use of electricity generated from low-carbon energy sources (RES) to facilitate exports from Russia with minimal CO2 emissions, which, in turn, will affect the reduction in NUTEP and KSK’s estimate indicators in reporting on indirect greenhouse gas emissions and other indirect carbon emissions for their customers. One of the first steps this agreement provides for is the supply of electricity generated from wind energy to the largest terminals in the Azov-Black Sea region of Russia: NUTEP Container Terminal and KSK Grain Terminal in Novorossiysk – both are a part of DeloPorts, a stevedore asset of the group). Atomenergopromsbyt, which is part of NovaWind, the wind energy division of Rosatom, acted as a partner in the project. Depending on the methodology adopted by the European Union, the indicators could reduce the “carbon tax” on exports to the EU for Russian exporters.   In many ways, it becomes the key to competitiveness and long-term commercial success. “Currently, more and more companies are choosing the path to sustainable business development. ROSATOM

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Delo Group, Russia’s largest transport and logistics holding, and Atomenergoprom, a company of state atomic corporation Rosatom consolidating all Russian civil assets, signed on April 13 an agreement for joint actions to promote switching of logistics terminals to low-carbon energy sources. “Rosatom is consistently implementing a strategy for low-carbon energy production based on nuclear and wind power,” Lyakhova said. The terminal’s customers include the largest international lines. KSK and NUTEP became the first large port infrastructure facilities in Russia to announce a switch to renewable energy. According to the agreement, from January 1, 2022, the terminals will be powered entirely by wind-generated electricity, Rosatom said. The agreement was signed on the sidelines of the International exhibition TransRussia-2021 by Delo Management Company CEO Igor Yakovenko and Rosatom Business Development head Ekaterina Lyakhova. The annual handling capacity of NUTEP is 700,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), the container turnover of the terminal in 2020 reached 487,000 TEUs. The share of NUTEP in the container turnover of the Azov-Black Sea basin is 61%, in Russia – 9%. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>Russia’s Delo Group and Rosatom switch Novorossiysk port terminals to wind power

By New Europe Online/KG

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The Karmalinovskaya wind farm began supplying electric power and capacity to the wholesale electric power and capacity market from April 1, 2021.

EPA-EFE//FELIPE TRUEB

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The Uzbek Energy Ministry has announced the signing of a new Presidential Decree on measures for the development of renewable and hydrogen energy in Uzbekistan that will lead to the construction of a hydrogen energy infrastructure, driving energy efficiency and security in the Central Asian country. The proposed hydrogen energy infrastructure, and introduction of further renewable energy sources into Uzbekistan’s energy mix, requires the implementation of scientific research. The announcement builds upon existing measures taken by Uzbekistan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce energy/resource consumption via energy-saving technologies, and increasing the use of renewable energy sources. This Decree follows an agreement signed earlier this year between the Uzbekistan Energy Ministry, Saudi Arabia’s ACWA Power and US’ Air Products for the development of hydrogen and renewable energy in Uzbekistan. In the fields of hydrogen energy and renewable energy, the Institute will implement scientific and practical research; develop innovative projects; analyse modern global development trends; and seek to achieve technological leadership in infrastructure provision. The Decree outlines measures to support a widespread introduction of innovative technologies to develop hydrogen energy and renewable energy sources; build a hydrogen energy infrastructure to promote energy efficiency and security; and enable Uzbekistan’s transition to a green economy. “Today’s Decree supporting the construction of a hydrogen energy infrastructure, and further development of renewable energy sources, is a great step forward in this process,” he added. In 2018, Uzbekistan ratified the Paris Agreement with the aim of developing clean energy sources, committing to reduce specific greenhouse gas emissions per unit of GDP by 10% by 2030, compared to 2010 levels.   “Uzbekistan is committed to tackling climate change and introducing environmentally friendly, renewable energy sources into the country’s energy mix,” Uzbekistan’s Energy Minister Alisher Sultanov said on April 9. The Decree has considered structural changes in demand for energy resources, and focuses on the development of  hydrogen energy, which alongside renewable energy sources, are environmentally friendly and can help Uzbekistan achieve a green economy, the Uzbek Energy Ministry said. A research centre for hydrogen energy, and a laboratory for testing and certification of renewable and hydrogen energy technologies, will also be created as part of the Institute, the Uzbek Energy Ministry said. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>Uzbekistan formalizes hydrogen energy strategy

By New Europe Online/KG

An electrolyse stack in the hydrogen power plant of the APEX Energy company in Laage, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. This research will be carried out by the National Research Institute of Renewable Energy Sources (“the Institute”), newly created by today’s Decree under the Ministry of Energy.

WindEurope CEO Giles Dickson reminded that wind energy remained an attractive investment despite the pandemic. The bigger wind farms are increasingly being turned into business entities with their own management teams and financial reporting, capable of raising debt on their own. And there are not enough staff in the permitting authorities to process the applications, not even the existing volumes let alone the higher volumes needed for our climate and energy goals. “The challenge currently facing the sector therefore lies not in access to capital, but in accessing a pipeline of investable projects. According to WindEurope, wind farms continue to be financed with 60-80% debt and 20-40% equity. So is the money. “But this is much less than what Europe needs to deliver its 2030 climate and energy goals. The EU needs to build 27 GW of new wind energy a year to deliver its new 55% emission reduction target. The revision of the EU Renewables Directive in the ‘Fit for 55’ package needs to tackle this. Banks lent a record €21bn of non-recourse debt to new wind farms in 2020. Another important trend is the growing role of corporate renewable Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) in supporting the financing of wind farms, WindEurope said. The investments cover 20 GW of new capacity that will be built in the coming years, 13 GW of it in the European Union. Most Member States are not meeting the permitting deadlines set out in the EU Renewable Energy Directive. Each new turbine generates €10 million of economic activity in Europe. But the right policies are missing, notably on the permitting of new farms where rules and procedures are too complex. Turkey was the 5th biggest investor with €1.6 billion, Poland 6th with €1.6 billion. The money’s out there, but not enough new projects are coming through,” WindEurope said. Governments need to simplify their permitting and ensure there are people to process the permit applications. Large projects boosted the offshore numbers, including Dogger Bank in the UK which will be Europe’s largest wind farm when completed and Hollandse Kust Zuid in the Netherlands. Europe confirmed €43 billion of investments in new wind farms in 2020, the second highest amount on record and 70% up on 2019,Wind Europe said in its annual report “Wind Energy Financing and Investment Trends,” adding that €17 billion was for onshore wind, covering 13 GW of new capacity and €26 billion was for offshore wind, covering 7 GW of new capacity. EPA/JESUS DIGES/FILE PICTURE

Germany and France invested the most in onshore wind, new WindEurope report shows

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Europe needs more wind energy to deliver its 2030 climate and energy goals, WindEurope said in a report on April 13. Investors are working hard to address this gap by delivering innovative capital structuring solutions that help make new projects happen,” Northam said. “The technology is available. Corporate and industrial energy consumers are increasingly keen to source power directly from wind farms, the trade body said, adding that 2020 saw 24 new wind energy PPAs covering more than 2 GW of capacity, signed across a range of sectors including chemicals, pharmaceuticals, telecoms and ICT. This confirms wind energy is perfectly positioned to support Europe’s economic recovery from COVID. Bank finance remains crucial, and more and more of it is project-specific rather than corporate debt, especially in offshore wind.   And the expansion of wind energy envisaged in the National Energy and Climate Plans can create 150,000 new jobs by 2030,” Dickson said. But last year’s investments cover only 13 GW of new wind capacity in the EU, WindEurope said. Permitting rules and procedures are too complex, which delays projects and adds costs – this results in fewer projects being developed. Dickson stressed that Europe wants more wind energy to deliver its climate and energy goals. EPA/JESUS DIGES

A wind turbine farm in Spain. Green Investment Group Europe head Edward Northam said wind projects present an extremely attractive opportunity for investors because they are one of the most mature, proven renewable technologies that can be delivered at scale. Germany and France invested the most in onshore wind. “Given the right revenue stabilisation mechanisms are in place, there is plenty of capital available to finance wind. According to the trade body, permitting remains the main bottleneck. France also financed its second and third offshore wind farm. The Netherlands were next with €8 billion. Then France (€6.5 billion) and Germany (€4.3 billion). The EU’s new 55% emissions reduction target for 2030 requires 27 GW a year of new wind energy in the EU. Otherwise there’s no point having a higher renewables target,” he said. The UK accounted for €1 3billion of the €43 billion investments. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>EU’s 55% emissions cut target for 2030 requires 27 GW a year of new wind energy

By New Europe Online/KG

epa05517478 The sun sets over the wind turbine farm of El Perdon in Navarra, Spain, 31 August 2016. The main problem is the slow rate of permitting of new wind farms.