The EEZ 2021 scheme will help Germany reach its renewable energy targets without unduly distorting competition and will contribute to the EU objective of achieving climate neutrality by 2050, the Commission said, adding that payments under the scheme for 2021 have been estimated to amount to around €33.1 billion. Finally, the Commission said the positive effects of the measure, in particular the positive environmental effects, outweigh its negative effects in terms of distortions to competition. The scheme also introduces small modifications to the German EEG surcharge reductions for energy intensive companies, a dedicated rule for surcharge reductions for hydrogen for energy intensive companies, as well as EEG surcharge reductions to promote the use of shore-side electricity by ships while at berth in ports. Moreover, innovation tenders for projects spanning several technologies will also be organised, allowing for a certain degree of technological neutrality and to gather experience on how to make electricity production from renewable energy sources (RES) installations less intermittent. In line with the evaluation requirement envisaged by the Guidelines on State aid for environmental protection and energy, Germany has developed a detailed plan for the independent economic evaluation of the EEG 2021, and has committed to improve the data gathering and the use of empirical methodologies in this respect, the EU Commission said, adding that Germany will assess the new features of the scheme covering for instance the innovation tenders and the efficiency of the scheme in achieving greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The scheme also introduces small modifications to the EEG surcharge reductions for energy intensive companies, a dedicated rule for surcharge reductions for hydrogen for energy intensive companies, as well as EEG surcharge reductions to promote the use of shore-side electricity by ships while at berth in ports. “Thanks to this measure, a higher share of electricity in Germany will be produced through renewable energy sources, contributing to further reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and supporting the objectives of the Green Deal,” she said. follow on twitter @energyinsider In conclusion, the Commission said the German scheme EEG 2021 is in line with EU State aid rules, as it supports projects promoting the use of renewable energy sources and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, in line with the European Green Deal, without unduly distorting competition. Hydrogen Europe Secretary General Jorgo Chatzimarkakis told New Europe on April 30 the new scheme lifts some important barriers for the use of electrolysers in order to produce hydrogen. The German scheme
Germany notified the Commission of its plans to prolong and modify its support scheme for renewable energy, replacing the support for renewable energy currently available under an existing scheme that the Commission approved as part of its decisions on the EEG 2017 and EEG 2014. Furthermore, the aid is proportionate and limited to the minimum necessary, as the level of aid will be set through competitive tenders. The Commission assessed the scheme under EU State aid rules, in particular the 2014 Guidelines on State aid for environmental protection and energy. Rules to sell electricity in line with market signals have also been further improved in the EEG 2021. The new measure will be applicable until end 2026. “The scheme introduces new features to ensure that aid is kept to the minimum and electricity production occurs in line with market signals, while at the same time ensuring the competitiveness of energy-intensive companies and reducing pollution caused by ships in harbour. According to the Commission, beneficiaries will generally receive support via a sliding premium on top of the electricity market price, with the exception of very small installations, which will be eligible to receive feed-in tariffs. Moreover, in the majority of cases, beneficiaries will be selected through competitive bidding processes. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>Germany’s renewable electric plan gets green light from EU

By Kostis Geropoulos
Energy & Russian Affairs Editor, New Europe

Margrethe Vestager

EU Commission Executive Vice-President of the European Commission gives a press conference on an antitrust case at the EC headquarters in Berlaymont, Brussels, Belgium, April 30, 2021. The Commission said aid is necessary to further develop the renewable and mine gas energy generation to meet Germany’s environmental goals. In this way, the scheme provides the best value for taxpayers’ money, while minimising possible distortions of competition,” Vestager added. Where remuneration is set administratively, the aid is limited to the production costs which cannot be recuperated through market revenue. The EEG 2021 scheme aims at a share of 65% of electricity produced from renewable energy sources by 2030, compared to 40% in 2019. In particular, tenders are organised per technology, including a newly introduced separation of rooftop and ground based solar photovoltaic, and separate tenders for biomethane. EUROPEAN UNION, 2021/EC – AUDIOVISUAL SERVICE/LUKASZ KOBUS

New scheme lifts some important barriers for the use of electrolysers in order to produce hydrogen

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The European Commission has approved, under EU State aid rules, the prolongation and modification of a German scheme to support the production of electricity from renewable energy sources and from mine gas, as well as reductions of charges to fund support for electricity from renewable sources, the EU’s competition chief said. According to the Commission, the reduction of charges will be available to energy-intensive companies and shore-side electricity supply to ships while at berth in ports. The German Renewable Energy Act (Erneuerbare Energien Gesetz – EEG) 2021 scheme will provide important support to the environmentally-friendly production of electricity, in line with EU rules, European Commission Executive Vice-President in charge of competition policy Margrethe Vestager said. “This is good news and important signal for investments in the sector of ‘HydroGenewables,’” he said. Finally, as biomass and onshore wind tenders have been regularly undersubscribed in the past, the EEG 2021 contains clear safeguards for tenders to be competitive, therefore unfolding their full potential to avoid overcompensation and to keep costs to a minimum for consumers and taxpayers. The results of the evaluation will be published by Germany.

The closed nature and secrecy of the nuclear power industry has not changed as much as it should have. As the demand for energy production grows, the EU, the governments of the individual European countries and the general population must invest and stimulate investments in alternative and more sustainable sources of energy, widespread conservation and energy efficiency. Improving the European innovation ecosystem shall not mean only creating new grant schemes or supporting businesses with public money. Its cost-effectiveness is exaggerated, as the real costs are not even known. I understand that in Chernobyl this was an old Soviet nuclear reactor model that exploded and was disconitnued, but there were 150 significant radiation leaks at nuclear power stations throughout the world before the Chernobyl disaster, as well as a number of serious accidents after the explosion. And as we strolled through streets, city parks were filled with friends and family members who were attending picnics, while at the power plant radiation levels spiked to 40 times the estimated lethal dosage. For those of us inside the Soviet Union at the time, we hadn’t any clue about that. The pandemic crisis aggravated the problem and saw much public liquidity being funneled with no return in sight. For some time after that experience, politically I simply rejected any use of nuclear energy. We need to have responsible statesmen to be extremely careful when constructing and procuring the operating capacity of nuclear power plants. There is the need to stimulate the flow of “smart” private capital in knowledge-intensive and experimental industrial and energy sources, while the role of universities in energy innovation should also improve. As the situation worsened, we walked around absolutely clueless that somewhere, not far away, about 50 workers died fighting the fire and over 4,000 others died from radiation poisoning. Higher upfront costs for alternative sources should not scare governments off from stimulating development and innovation. It is also as good a time as ever to reflect on specific lessons for the further development of nuclear and other sources of energy, and what sort of effects they have on public health, the environment and quality of life. The 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster is the perfect time to reflect on how to prevent, manage and recover from such accidents. It also makes us look at the responsibility of the government and the need for accurate and honest information during a time of crisis. The nuclear fallout from the explosions spread over what are now Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia, as well as most of Europe. That year, the weather in Ukraine was beautiful and people celebrated outside at mass public and private gatherings. The authorities began evacuating and dispersing around t135,000 people from the bedroom community towns that surrounded Chernobyl. Another area of concern is the prospect of a  terrorist attack on power reactors or that terrorist groups could acquire fissile material. More than three decades after Chernobyl, the world must have a plan and an allocated budget for transitioning to efficient, safe and renewable energy. View of Lenin Square in the ghost city of Pripyat, located less than 5km from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. The announcer failed to mention that previous tests had failed and that during that fatal test on April 26, the power unexpectedly dropped to a near-zero level and that the operators proceeded with the electrical test triggering a reactor shutdown. It is also necessary to realize that nuclear power is not enough for energy sufficiency or climate change. There were several public holidays in the Soviet Union in early May. Europe has a longstanding problem in making sufficient financing available to highly innovative firms, including in the energy sector. We were confronted by a crisis which we could barely understand and against which we had no defense. In the 1990s, I joined Greenpeace and advocated against nuclear power and told the story that unfolded in front of my eyes in 1986. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>Chernobyl and the hope for a safer and more sustainable future

By Sasha Borovik
Former First Deputy Minister of Economy of Ukraine responsible for the international donor coordination and the former Acting Deputy Governor at the Odessa Regional State Administration. A memorial to the victims of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster, with the power plant's infamous Number 4 reactor in the background. It later became clear to me that with many countries hugely dependent on nuclear energy that we cannot simply and immediately reject all nuclear power. On the evening of April 28, a 20-second announcement was read durin the main Soviet TV news program, simply stating that there was an accident and its effects are being remedied. We had no idea that a combination of unstable conditions and reactor design flaws caused an uncontrolled nuclear reaction where a large amount of energy was suddenly released, and two explosions ruptured the reactor core and destroyed the reactor building. What the announcement did not say was that the accident started during a safety test on an RBMK-type nuclear reactor. One was a highly destructive steam explosion from the vaporizing superheated cooling water and the other could have been a small nuclear explosion that was immediately followed by an open-air reactor core fire that released considerable airborne radioactive contamination for days. At the time, I was a university student living several hundred kilometers west of Chernobyl’s location, which was located near the administrative borders of the Ukrainian and Byelorussian SSRs. FLICKR

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The accident that took place 35 years ago on April 26, 1986, at the Chernobyl nuclear power station remains one of the worst man-made disasters in human history. While we can save money and the environment by using renewable energy, these technologies are typically more expensive than traditional energy generators. The test was a simulation of an electrical power outage to help create a safety procedure for maintaining reactor cooling water circulation until the backup electrical generators could provide power. It was at this time that news and gossip started to spread. We need full transparency, public and international oversight and regulation of the nuclear power industry, along with complete emergency preparedness and response mechanisms. It still continues to offer many lessons. I later learned that radiation alarms went off at the Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant in Sweden, over 1,000 kilometers north of Chernobyl.

The hydrocarbons lie at a depth of about 4,000 meters with abnormally high formation pressures (up to 62 MPa). The production will amount to over 14 billion cubic meters of natural gas and over 5 million tons of gas condensate. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>Gazprom and Wintershall Dea to begin production at Block 5A of Urengoyskoye field

By New Europe Online/KG

GAZPROM

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A joint venture of Russian gas monopoly Gazprom and Germany’s Wintershall Dea, Achim Development, started gas and gas condensate production from Block 5А in the Achimov formations of the Urengoyskoye field within the framework of comprehensive testing of the project equipment, Gazprom said. The pre-development of the blocks is performed under harsh natural and climatic conditions and in complex geological structures. Currently, both blocks – 4А and 5А – are in the phase of comprehensive testing, and gas is being fed into Gazprom’s gas transmission system, Gazprom said. Earlier in January 2021, hydrocarbon production began at Block 4А in the Achimov formations of the Urengoyskoye field. Upon the completion of the comprehensive testing, production will be gradually ramped up to reach its design capacity by 2027.

“Although I would have preferred an even larger budget for LIFE, I am very pleased that we have reached a new level of commitment towards nature and climate, so the programme can continue to test ideas and showcase future green solutions,” he said, adding that LIFE can now also mobilise additional funding for actions on nature, climate and energy much better. According to the Parliament, the EU programme will contribute to making the necessary shift towards a clean, circular, energy-efficient, low-carbon and climate-resilient economy, to protect and improve the quality of the environment, and to halt and reverse biodiversity loss. According to the Parliament, the Commission will regularly monitor and report on mainstreaming of climate and biodiversity objectives, including tracking expenditure. LIFE will also support many biodiversity projects and contribute to spending 7.5% of the annual EU budget on biodiversity objectives from 2024 and 10% in 2026 and 2027. EPA/CHRISTIAN BRUNA/FILE PICTURE

LIFE helps achieve a low-carbon and climate-resilient economy

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Members of the European Parliament on April 29 officially approved the deal with member states on LIFE, the only programme at EU-level solely dedicated to the environment and climate. The total budget allocated for LIFE in the compromise on the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework is €5.4 billion (current prices), of which €3.5 billion will go to environmental activities and €1.9 billion to climate action. It will enter into force retroactively from January 1, 2021. EPA/CHRISTIAN BRUNA

Wind turbines are seen during sunset near Mistelbach, Austria. When making decisions on what to fund, the Commission should prioritise projects that among other issues, have a clear cross border European interest, the highest potential for replicability and for being taken up by the public or private sector, or for mobilising the largest investments, the EU Parliament said in  a press release, adding that LIFE will also promote the use of green public procurement. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>EU Parliament approves investment deal to boost climate and environmental projects

By New Europe Online/KG

epa06017840 Wind turbines are seen during sunset near Mistelbach, Austria, 08 June 2017. The EU programme will contribute to making the necessary shift towards a clean, circular, energy-efficient, low-carbon and climate-resilient economy. “When we look at what has been achieved by LIFE so far, it is clear that a bigger budget can help us achieve even more in the future, the rapporteur, Finnish MEP Nils Torvalds said. The programme will contribute to making climate actions a key aspect of all EU policies and to achieving the overall target of spending at least 30% of the EU’s budget on climate objectives, the press release read.

This only illustrates the extent of the operation of the Russian intelligence units on Czech territory, but the whole scope of activities remains unknown, at least publicly. An additional ten were brought to investigation. On the NATO question, the NAC has already been summoned and delivered a common statement, which is not very ambitious but illustrates NATO’s support for the Czech Republic, which still counts. The line is closely connected to Bulgaria and Gebrev, as was revealed by RFE/RL, which backs the official version about the transport of the goods to Ukraine via Bulgaria. Many experts and Russia watchers say that this will not happen because of Russian domestic and economic problems, and since there could be a stronger reaction from the European Union’s side (such as additional systemic/economic sanctions etc) and we know that the Russian economy and rouble did not react well to the US sanctions related to the debt issue. Finally, I can imagine Prague asking for a special emergency EU Council, but it will more likely take place on May 7, where the prime minister will ask for additional measures and an EU response. It is similar for Poland, which has expelled three Russians already. Will/should Prague be demanding new sanctions, how realistic is that? Also, it might be now more difficult for Czech companies to operate on the Russian markets for the sake of its politicization, along with the lack of rule of law and market conditions and the like. NE: Chancellor Merkel stated that “the politization of Nord Stream 2 pipeline is harmful”: is that an indirect answer to a silent plea from Prague towards Germany to take its side? On the one hand, they support the Czech Republic, as Heiko Maas has done already, and offered their help with Russia directly, but at the same time, they insist on their own priorities and interests, which is harming the common European line on this. PH: Quite fundamentally, even the otherwise rather pro-Russian politicians (such as the president, Milos Zeman) have supported the government’s line, even if we now see more siding with alternative scenarios, especially from the side of the extreme political forces (like the Communists, or the Far Right). Pavel Havlicek, a Research Fellow at the Asociace pro mezinarodni otazky )Association for International Affairs) gives his thoughts on the events. NE: According to the latest information, the GRU team might have had Czech citizen accomplices who were arrested – how deep does the Kremlin influence go on Czech soil? PH: This is an excellent question, but really hard to give a definite answer to. Are they attempting to influence political parties through funding or covert endorsement? High diplomatic drama has been enacted since Czech intelligence uncovered hard evidence that the identities of the perpetrators behind the detonation of military supplies in 2014 were the same two operatives from Russia’s GRU intelligence services who attempted to eliminate former FSB agent-turned-informer-for-British intelligence, Sergei Skripal, in England in 2018 with a chemical nerve agent has been a catalyst for addressing thorny internal issues in the Czech Republic; principally about the geopolitical alignment of the country’s president, Milos Zeman, who for years has been widely seen as the most pro-Putin of any of the European Union’s leaders. But there were already some speculations about banning particular goods, which I could imagine. PH: Two things on this one. Czech President Milos Zeman (L) and Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) speak with each other during their bilateral meeting in Sochi, Russia. Do you expect any mirror-response from Russia on this front, similar to their reaction of expelling Czech diplomats? Finally, Germany and Lithuania promised to support the Czech Republic in Russia by their diplomatic missions, which is also significant. First, it is still an ongoing quest for support. Nobody really expected this, even if there were some suspicions at some levels of the GRU’s involvement for the past three weeks. NE: So far, the most robust Czech response amounted to the exclusion of the Rosatom company from the list of participants for the completion of the Dukovany nuclear power plant. NE: What was the reaction from the Czech public – was it a shock for the country? Pavel Havlicek (PH): I subscribe to the official version, which was presented by the government, and then backed by the law enforcement bodies and the highest prosecutor, Pavel Zeman. We have so far received practical support from the three Baltic countries and Slovakia, which together expelled seven diplomats. For the Russian state-owned company, this means the loss of a potential contract of at least $6 billion. As mentioned previously, it took Theresa May around 2-3 weeks to negotiate a robust response from the global community, which ultimately meant that 33 Russian diplomats were expelled from the European Union. Support was also received from the Visegrad 4 group, initiated by Slovakia and its Foreign Minister Ivan Korcok. In any case, the Czech-Russia official bilateral track of relations is, and will be for the time being, paralyzed. The consequences are also going beyond politics and diplomacy, with Russia´s Rosatom company now having been excluded from the nuclear Dukovany-II tender. PH: This is yet to be seen. We are so far at seven, plus there are an additional three from Poland for a separate case. They spoke about the GRU’s involvement during the crucial days of the events seven years ago, their registration for the visit of the ammo depots, and the explosions that followed afterwards. But there could be much more on the EU and NATO level, this is true. We know that the Czech intelligence and specialised police unit responsible for fighting organised crime (the NCOZ) consequently launched an operation against paramilitary units responsible for transporting people to the so-called separatist territories in Ukraine’s Donbass region, by which they directly and indirectly (financially) supported terrorism. PH: Yes, I think Prague should be ambitious and keep asking for a coordinated response on the EU and NATO levels, as well as from individual member states. Other countries, including the US and UK, were very expressive in their official support, but they have their own situations; the US expelled 10 diplomats for their own domestic affair, but just today summoned the charge-de-affairs to blame him for the affair in the Czech Republic. New Europe (NE): With the investigation still ongoing and new details continually emerging, can you provide your own assessment of the situation? EPA-EFE/.MIKHAIL KLIMENTYEV/SPUTNIK
NE: How will this impact the relationship between the Czech Republic and Russia, especially considering the current Czech leadership’s reputation as one of the most Pro-Kremlin in all Europe? Why did the Czech request fell on deaf ears? NE: Over the Skripal case, the US imposed additional sanctions at the request of the UK. Five people were accused of crimes related to terrorism. I believe that more should be done, but we are slowly and surely getting there. You received verbal support, but the actual response was fairly underwhelming. PH: Yes, it was an enormous shock and surprise. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>Check the Czechs

By Timothy Ogden
A UK-born freelance journalist based in Tbilisi, focusing on defence matters

The Charles Bridge in the Czech capital, Prague, EPA-EFE//MARTIN DIVISEK

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With the Czech Republic having the dubious honor of hosting the latest chapter in the ongoing saga of the West versus Vladimir Putin’s Russia in the new Cold War, all eyes have recently been turned to Prague. Are Kremlin operatives active in spreading Russian propaganda and fake news? PH: As usual, the Germans and German diplomacy prefer to go a different way and get more things at the same time. NE: The Czech Republic requested solidarity expulsions of Russian diplomats from the EU and NATO as a sign of support. The detonation was likely meant to happen only later, and the first explosion was accidental (the second explosion only took place several weeks after).

A child sits on his father’s shoulders holding an Armenian flag as thousands take part in a demonstration to commemorate the anniversary of the Armenian genocide in front of the Turkish consulate in Los Angeles, California.  
Although with some nuanced language in the statement’s reference to Ottoman Turkey rather than the modern Republic of Turkey, the U.S. But this year’s statement was eagerly anticipated, as the Biden Administration was widely expected to break with the previous position by boldly acknowledging and affirming the Armenian Genocide. In this way, the U.S. EPA-EFE//ETIENNE LAURENT
From this perspective, the genocide recognition is in part a move to regain some of the United States’ moral standing that was lost under Donald Trump and stands out as an element in a broader strategy to correct the policy mistakes of the past as a course correction. And as an emotional vindication, the statement was especially welcome in Armenia, in light of the lingering shock from an unexpected loss to Turkish-backed Azerbaijan in the war for Nagorno Karabakh late last year. But most importantly, the Biden announcement is more about defining a principled moral stand to defend the historical veracity of the Armenian genocide and less about Turkish sensitivities or excuses. And while it is precedent-setting, making it difficult for any U.S. The monument is dedicated to the estimated 1.5 million Armenians who were exterminated by the Ottoman Turks during World War I. statement demonstrated that geopolitics are no longer an effective excuse for genocide denial. president’s commemorative recognition of the Armenian genocide was significant for several reasons.  
But a fourth factor of significance stems from the decision by the United States to call the bluff of the Turkish government and to face down the bellicose threats from Turkey over genocide recognition. In this way, the Biden recognition only exposes the moral weakness of other Western leaders who may still cling to Turkey’s policy of denial and historical revisionism. president to retreat later, it also helps Washington to begin to regain and restore the moral high ground in international relations. And third, it was a move to not necessarily punish Turkey, but to help Turkey to more sincerely deal with its difficult past. statement also makes the genocide issue less confrontational for Turkey and offers a fresh opportunity for Turkey to reengage in the earlier diplomatic effort with Armenia to “normalize” relations. recognition. recognition of the Armenian genocide

By Richard Giragosian
Founding Director of the Regional Studies Center

The eternal flame inside Yerevan’s genocide memorial. And its relevance is lasting, for not only affirming the past but to also safeguard the future to deter any future reoccurrence of genocide or related heinous crimes against humanity. FLICKR

The eternal flame inside Yerevan's genocide memorial.  
Unlike previous American presidents, those hopes and expectations were met with no political equivocation or use of semantics. The monument is dedicated to the estimated 1.5 million Armenians who were exterminated by the Ottoman Turks during World War I. And moving forward, the U.S. FLICKR

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Like every U.S.  
Clearly, for Armenians both in Armenia and throughout the global diaspora, the moral clarity and moral courage of the Biden statement, which directly and explicitly refers to the Armenian genocide twice, was hailed as a long-sought vindication of a determined campaign to secure official U.S. But in real terms, the Biden statement has no legal or even policy implications for Armenia. It was not vindicative, but rather, was a vindication of history. Breaking with recent precedence, President Biden fully embraced the suffering of the Armenians by referring to the massacres and forced dispossession in 1915 as clear components of the crime of genocide. leader before him, President Joseph Biden issued a commemorative statement on April 24 to mark the annual commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915. This latter point also offered a second significant factor, whereby other Western countries, such as the UK for one prominent example, will be hard-pressed to follow suit and come under pressure to no longer back or buttress Turkish denial of the genocide. Nevertheless, it does extend significant credence and political capital to the Armenian quest for recognition and reassurance. It may also help to end the destructive and counter-productive state policy of genocide denial by the Turkish government. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>The significance of U.S.

This could happen only if the EU’s institutions ensure patience, firmness and absolute diligence. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>Greece’s 40-year participation in the European project: Future challenges and perspectives

By Spyros Kapralos
A European Politics analyst, ECI Political Communication in European Sphere lecturer. For instance, a remarkable percentage of young Greeks have had to look for jobs abroad. As a result, on the occasion of the celebration of the 40th anniversary of Greece’s presence in the European Union, the government faces a series of challenges for the rational use of provided funds. Nevertheless, direct communication between institutions and society could be the appropriate component for individuals to simply deepen the understanding of cooperation within Europe. Forty years ago Greece became the tenth member of the bloc. Protesters hold Greek and EU flags in front of the parliament during a rally demanding that Greece remains in the Eurozone, in Athens, Greece, 22 June 2015. EPA-EFE/BENOIT TESSIER
Populism, as well as anti-Europeanism, still remain fierce forces. French President Emmanuel Macron (R) and Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis (L), attend a joint statement at the Elysee Palace in Paris. If Greece avoids the unnecessary mistakes of the past, the state will inevitably be able to perform well for its citizens. In the meantime, local Greek authorities have already announced certain sufficient measures, especially since the first installments will be paid out during the summer. According to statistics, the respondents accept the targeted use of the recovery fund as a trigger for a sustainable perspective. Battling the odds, due to the Coronavirus pandemic’s social and economic consequences, Brussels should immediately address the majority’s concerns through a serious effort to achieve a resilient, sustainable and promising common future. Fears are mounting that Greece is about to run out of money, with the country facing a 1.6-billion-euro IMF repayment deadline on June 30. The Eurozone’s 19 national leaders hold an emergency summit in Brussels to discuss the crisis. Additionally, Greece should deal with important challenges in relation to its European future. There is no longer any excuse for hollow proclamations, wrong turns and setbacks. Crowdsourcing – in order to attract the audience and to recreate a stable relationship of trust across the European Continent. Europe needs to cultivate and expand a new culture of collaboration, solidarity and coevolution by using open innovation tolls – e.g. In times of crisis, a long discussion took place regarding the rise of unemployment, the decrease in salaries and the emergence of many different social problems. to reassess the real meaning and contribution of the European institutions in the public sphere. The EU institutions are key figures and preside over the largest restart initiative in recent European history for the benefit of its citizens and future generations. On the one hand, Europe, in the broadest sense, has been blamed – sometimes unfairly – for the mismanagement of serious crises. The fact that a few opposition parties did not believe in the particular endeavor was not a deterrent for the majority of individuals to have benefited. Since then everything has rapidly changed, and as a result, a large proportion of the population has created wealth, prosperity, opportunities and progress. On the other hand, those who have primarily suffered were able to discover brand new opportunities, far beyond their national borders. Facebook

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It would undoubtedly be effective for all Greeks, at this present time. It also requires effective planning so that Greeks can overcome a growing sense of fatigue.