EU countries agree to mutually recognise rapid antigen tests

Commenting on the agreement, the bloc’s Health chief, Stella Kyriakides said that “this is essential, particularly in the context of travel. Our citizens need clarity and predictability.”
The move followed a Council recommendation on January 21, during which, the EU heads of state and government set a common framework for the use of rapid antigen tests and the mutual recognition. “The common list of rapid antigen tests will be regularly reviewed by Member States in the context of Health Security Committee meetings, and, if necessary, be updated in line with new results from independent validation studies becoming available and new tests entering the markets, reads a statement by the EU Health Security committee. style=”font-size:40px; line-height: 1.3em; font-weight: 800; padding:7px;”>EU countries agree to mutually recognise rapid antigen tests

By Zoe Didili
Journalist, New Europe

epa08827327 Greek medical staff performs a Covid 19 rapid test just after collecting a swab from passing drivers in Argos, Peloponnese, Greece, 18 November 2020. EPA-EFE/BOUGIOTIS VANGELIS

Greek medical staff performs a Covid 19 rapid test just after collecting a swab from passing drivers in Argos, Peloponnese, Greece, 18 November 2020. EPA-EFE/BOUGIOTIS VANGELIS

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The EU’s Health Security committee agreed on Thursday on a list of rapid antigen tests, which will be mutually recognised by member states, as well as on a common standardised set of data to be included in COVID-19 test result certificates.   The recommendation, adopted during an informal summit on the coronavirus coordination, included a common list of COVID-19 rapid antigen tests that are considered appropriate for use, a selection of rapid antigen tests of which Member States will mutually recognise the test results for public health measures and a common standardised set of data to be included in COVID-19 test result certificates, that will facilitate the mutual recognition of the rapid antigen tests.